Mass Times

Mon-Fri 7:00 am, 12:10 pm
Sat 7:00 am

Sat Vigil 5:15 pm
Sun 7:30 am, 9:00 am, 10:30 am (French), 12:15 pm

Holy Days: 7:00 am, 12:10 pm, 6:30 pm


The Church Sanctuary is open:
Mon-Fri: 6:30 am - 3:00 pm
Sat: 6:30 am - 7:30 am & 2:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Sun: 7:00 am - 1:30 pm


Reconciliation: Before each weekday Mass and every Saturday from 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm

Adoration & Benediction: 1st Friday of every month from 10:00am - 12:00pm
Sign up for a February
 time slot or join us at any time.

Holy Rosary: Saturdays before the 5:15 pm Mass and Sundays before the 12:15 pm Mass

Our Office

566 Bush Street, San Francisco, CA 94108

Mon-Fri 8:30 am - 5:00 pm (Closed 12:00 pm-12:45 pm)

Email: [email protected]
Phone: 415-397-0113

A Blessed Christmas to All

Giving


Pause to Pray


"The daily 3 Minute Retreat is a short prayer break at your computer that can give you 24 hours of peace."
- Loyola Press


Click here for today's unique retreat.

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What if....

"... I am unbaptized but want to grow spiritually in my life."
"... I have a different faith background but want to learn
what Catholics believe and why."
"... I am a baptized Catholic but never made my First Holy
Communion and/or Confirmation."

 

..... we would love to assist you in your faith journey through an exciting and deeply enriching process in the Catholic Church called the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (R.C.I.A.). RCIA is for those who are seeking a better relationship with God, who are looking for more information about Catholic Christianity, or who are seeking to grow in their spiritual or Sacramental life. The RCIA process welcomes the unbaptized person to the family of Jesus Christ. Sessions are informal and comfortable opportunities to explore the Catholic faith with presentations, discussions, and fellowship.

Explore the faith without obligation & contact Rev. Juan Gonzalez to learn more!
[email protected]

Time slots for Adoration & Benediction on February 7th are now available. If a time you would like to be present is already taken, show up anyway! The more the merrier!  

 

 "When you look at the crucifix, you understand how much Jesus loved you then. When you look at the Sacred Host, you understand how much Jesus loves you now."
~ St. Teresa of Calcutta ~


Calendar

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Congratulations Newly Weds

Saint of the Day

St. Anthony the Abbot: Saint of the Day for Friday, January 17, 2020

Two Greek philosophers ventured out into the Egyptian desert to the mountain where Anthony lived. When they got there, Anthony asked them why they ...

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St. Fursey: Saint of the Day for Thursday, January 16, 2020

Irish monastic founder, the brother of Sts. Foillan and Ulan, praised by St. Bede. Fursey was born on the island of Inisguia en Lough Carri, ...

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St. Paul the Hermit: Saint of the Day for Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Also known as Paul the First Hermit and Paul of Thebes, an Egyptian hermit and friend of St. Jerome. Born in Lower The baid, Egypt, he was left an ...

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Bishop Barron

“1917” and Remembering Who We Are

I saw the film 1917 on the vigil of the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, and I think there’s a connection between the movie and the liturgical celebration. Bear with me. First, as everyone who has seen it remarks, the editing and cinematography of 1917 are so astounding that it appears to unfold completely in real time, the result of one continuous shot. Think of the famous scene from Scorsese’s Goodfellas, in which Ray Liotta and his date walk into the night club—but now stretched out for two hours. What this produces in the viewer is an almost unprecedented sense of being there, experiencing the events with the characters in the film. And to be inserted into the First World War is, to put it mildly, horrific. Obviously, all wars are terrible, but there was just something uniquely appalling about World War I: the oppressiveness of the trenches,…

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“1917” y recordando quiénes somos

Vi la película 1917 la vigilia de la fiesta del Bautismo del Señor, y creo que hay una conexión entre la película y la celebración litúrgica. Tengan paciencia. En primer lugar, como comentan todos los que lo han visto, el montaje y la cinematografía de 1917 son tan sorprendentes que parece desarrollarse completamente en tiempo real, el resultado de una toma continua. Piensen en la famosa escena de la película Goodfellas (Uno de los nuestros en España y Buenos muchachos en Hispanoamérica), donde Ray Liotta y la chica con la que tenía una cita entran en el club nocturno, pero estirada durante dos horas. Lo que esto produce en el espectador es una sensación casi inédita de estar allí, experimentando los acontecimientos con los personajes de la película. Y ser insertados en la Primera Guerra Mundial es, por decirlo suavemente, horroroso. Obviamente, todas las guerras son terribles, pero hubo algo…

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The One Pope

The new and much-ballyhooed Netflix film The Two Popes should, by rights, be called The One Pope, for it presents a fairly nuanced, textured, and sympathetic portrait of Jorge Mario Bergoglio (Pope Francis) and a complete caricature of Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Benedict XVI). This imbalance fatally undermines the movie, whose purpose, it seems, is to show that old grumpy, legalistic Benedict finds his spiritual bearings through the ministrations of friendly, forward-looking Francis. But such a thematic trajectory ultimately does violence to both figures, and turns what could have been a supremely interesting character study into a predictable and tedious apologia for the filmmaker’s preferred version of Catholicism. That we are dealing with a caricature of Ratzinger becomes clear when, in the opening minutes of the film, the Bavarian Cardinal is presented as ambitiously plotting to secure his election as Pope in 2005. On at least three occasions, the real Cardinal…

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